KJV Part 3

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3. Should the Forgotten Books be a Part of Our Scriptures?

Should the "Forgotten Books" (Enoch, Books of Adam & Eve, and quite a few others re-discovered quite recently) be part of our Scriptures? Maybe even the so-called Apocrypha as well? After all, Paul says in 1 CORINTHIANS 5 "I wrote unto you in a (previous) epistle ..." – what do you think about this?

Answer:

Dr Samuel C. Gipp, in his book "The Answer Book", mentions the following points about the Apocrypha:
1. None of the books in question are written in the Hebrew language (which was the only language used by the inspired writers of the Old Testament).
2. None of the writers lay any claim to inspiration.
3. These books were never acknowledged as sacred Scriptures by the Jewish Church, and therefore were never sanctioned by our Lord.
4. They were not allowed a place among the sacred books during the first four centuries of the Christian Church.
5. They contain “incredible” and contradictory statements (Antiochus Epiphanes is made to die three different deaths in as many different places in the two Books of Maccabees).
6. They contain doctrines that are at variance with the Bible, such as prayer for the dead and sinless perfection.
7. The Apocrypha teaches such practices as lying, suicide, assassination and magical incantation.


The Bible does mention other books and epistles, but does this authorise us to add anything to the Bible? These books may be interesting for historical study, but this does not mean they qualify for what the Bible describes as the inspired "Word of God". This is particularly the case when their own teachings, their comparison against accepted Scripture as well as the testimony of Jesus Christ and the Early Church, do NOT show them to be inspired.

"EVERY WORD OF GOD IS PURE: HE IS A SHIELD UNTO THEM THAT PUT THEIR TRUST IN HIM. ADD NOT UNTO HIS WORDS, LEST HE REPROVE THEE, AND THOU BE FOUND A LIAR" PROVERBS 30:5-6.