Table of Compatible Foods

Columns I and III are incompatible

Column I Column II Column III
For Protein meals

PROTEINS

Meat of all kinds: Beef, lamb, venison

Poultry: Chicken, turkey

Game: Pheasant, partridge, grouse

Fish of all kinds

Eggs

Cheese

Milk, including soya (combines
best with fruit and should not be
served at a meat meal)

Yoghurt, including soya

FRUITS

Apples

Apricots (fresh & dried)

Blackberries

Blueberries

Cherries

Currants (black, red or white if ripe)

Gooseberries (if ripe)

Grapefruit

Grapes

Guavas

Kiwis

Lemons

Limes

Loganberries

Lychees

Mangoes

Melons (best eaten alone as a fruit
meal)

Nectarines

Oranges

Passion fruit

Pears

Pineapples

Prunes (for occasional use)

Raspberries

Satsumas

Strawberries

Tangerines

N.B. Cranberies, plums and
rhubarb are not recommended

SALAD DRESSINGS

French dressing made with oil and
lemon juice or apple cider
vinegar

Cream dressing

Mayonnaise (home-made)

SUGAR SUBSTITUTE

Diluted frozen orange juice

Concentrated apple juice

FOR VEGETARIANS

(but not recommended)

Legumes

Lentils

**Soya beans

Kidney beans

Chick peas (garbanzos)

Butter (lima) beans

Pinto beans

**Tofu
Neutral Foods
(can be combined with either
Column I or Column III)

NUTS

All except peanuts

FATS

Butter

Cream

Egg yolks

Olive oil (virgin)

Sunflower seed oil

Sesame seed oil (cold pressed)

VEGETABLES

All green and root vegetables
except potatoes and Jerusalem
artichokes

Asparagus

Aubergines (eggplants)

Beans (all fresh green beans)

Beetroot

Broccoli

Brussels sprouts

Cabbage

Calabrese

Carrots

Cauliflower

Celery

Celeriac

Courgettes (zucchini)

Kohlrabi

Leeks

Marrow (squash)

Onions

Parsnips

Peas

Spinach

Swedes (rutabagas)

Turnips

SALADINGS

Avocados

Chicory (endive)

Corn salad

Cucumber

Endive (chicory)

Fennel

Garlic

Lettuce

Mustard & cress

Peppers, red and green

Radishes

Spring onions (scallions)

Sprouted legumes

Sprouted seeds

Tomatoes (uncooked)

Watercress

HERBS & FLAVOURINGS

Chives

Mint

Parsley

Sage

Tarragon

Thyme

Grated lemon rind*

Grated orange rind**

SEEDS & SEED SPREADS

Sunflower

Sesame

Pumpkin

BRAN

Wheat or oat bran

Wheat germ or oatgerm

SUGAR SUBSTITUTE

Raisins and raisin juice

Honey

Maple syrup
For Starch Meals

CEREALS

Wholegrain: Wheat, barley, maize,
oats, millet, rice (brown,
unpolished), rye

Bread 100% wholewheat

Flour 100% or 85%

Oatmeal - medium

SWEET FRUITS

Bananas - ripe

Custard apples

Dates

Figs (fresh & dried)

Grapes - extra sweet

Papaya if very ripe

Pears if very sweet and ripe

Currants

Raisins

Sultanas

VEGETABLES

Potatoes

Jerusalem artichokes

Pumpkin

Sweet Potatoes

MILK & YOGHURT

only in moderation

SALAD DRESSINGS

Sweet or soured cream

Olive oil or cold pressed seed oils

Fresh tomato juice with oil and
seasoning

SUGAR SUBSTITUTE

Barbados sugar

Honey - in strict
moderation

* Use only organically grown fruit ** All soya products are processed; use sparingly

Explanation on how to use the food combining table

This table is based on the Hay diet and was created by Dr W. H. Hay. The basic principle of food combining is that food can be classified into 3 types according to the chemicals required to digest them in your body:

  1. Alkali forming foods such as fruits and vegetables. Alkali forming means the end products of such foods after digestion. Even acid tasting fruits such as lemons yield alkaline salts in the body.
  2. Concentrated proteins such as meat, game, fish, eggs or cheese. These foods are acid forming in their final end products in the body.
  3. Concentrated carbohydrates or starch foods, which are acid forming. These include grains, bread, and all foods containing flour, all sugars and foods containing sugars (sucrose), but not the naturally occurring sugars found in fruit.

The Hay rules for health

  • Starches and sugars should not be eaten with proteins and acid fruits at the same meal.
  • Vegetables, salads and fruits (whether acid or sweet) if correctly combined should form the major part of the diet.
  • Proteins, starches and fats should be eaten in small quantities.
  • Only whole grains and unprocessed starches should be used and all refined and processed foods should be eliminated from the diet.
  • Not less than four hours between starch and protein meals.
  • Milk does not combine well with food and should be kept to a minimum.
  • Don't mix foods that fight, see below chart.

Putting this into practice

The easiest way is to have one meal with only animal protein, one with cereal starches and one with raw fruit, with milk or yoghurt if desired, each day.

For example:

Breakfast: Alkaline meal

Fresh fruit, with a pot of plain yoghurt and a tablespoon of wheat germ.

Lunch: Starch meal

Salad, baked potato, steamed veggies, sweet fruit (e.g. banana) to follow or Salad sandwich on wholemeal bread (no cheese but butter is ok), vegetable soup and a sweet fruit.

Dinner: Protein meal

Salad or Vegetable Soup

Meat 

Vegetables (but not potatoes)